Ichthyosis Related Research Articles

Topical Tazarotene - Brittany Craiglow, MD, Keith Choate, MD, PhD, Leonard Milstone, MD - 11/2013

Topical Tazarotene for the Treatment of Ectropion in Ichthyosis

Many individuals affected with ichthyosis cite ectropion – an abnormal eversion of eyelids – as one of the most cosmetically displeasing aspects of their skin disorder.  And although ectropion almost universally improves beyond the neonatal period, it can persist throughout life and medical consequences including keratitis,* conjunctivitis,* and epiphora* can ensue.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 The Shedding Process - Peter Elias, MD - 6/2013
Bathing Completes the Shedding Process ... naturally

Bathing may be even more important to the shedding process, than previously considered, as it does not only cleanse our skin of dirt and other external debris, it completes the natural process of desquamation, sweeping away spent and finished epidermal cells.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ichthyosis Incidence Study - Leonard Milstone, MD - 10/31/12

Study estimates number of ichthyosis patients in US

There are widely accepted incidence figures for the common forms of ichthyosis, ichthyosis vulgaris, and X-linked ichthyosis. Until now, however, figures for the incidence of rarer, generally more severe forms of ichthyosis have been approximations. Accurate figures for incidence of moderate to severe ichthyosis are important when advocating on behalf of those affected and when requesting funds from governmental or private, non-governmental agencies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Pathogenesis-Based Therapy - Amy Paller, MD - 10/2/12
Pathogenesis-Based Therapy Reverses Cutaneous Abnormalities in an Inherited Disorder of Distal Cholesterol Metabolism

Although the scaling that characterizes ichthyosis often occurs as the body's attempt to provide a better barrier against water loss and protection from the outside, peeling agents and moisturizers are the way most ichthyosis is treated. During the past decade or two, however, scientists have discovered the genetic and biochemical basis of most forms of ichthyosis.  These discoveries provides an opportunity to use mechanism-targeted topical therapy.

Autosomal Recessive Ichthyosis - Richard Eckert, MD & Kapil Mehta, MD - 7/2012
Understanding Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis (ARCI)

Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is an inherited genetic disease that affects 1 of every 250,000 people.  It includes lamellar ichthyosis (i.e. the plate-like scales) and CIE (i.e. congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma).  The type I transglutaminase (TG1) gene is mutated in many of these disease patients.  The TG1 protein is required for skin maturation and mutation of this protein results in deficient epidermal cornification leading to an abnormal epidermal surface including the production of plate-like “fish” scales.  TG1 mutations are found in a significant percentage of ARCI patients; however, understanding how these mutations lead to disease pathology is not well understood.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ELOVL4 Deficiency - William B. Rizzo, MD - 2011
A New Form of Ichthyosis Discovered by Next-Generation DNA Sequencing

Recent advances in “Next-Generation” DNA sequencing technologies promise to revolutionize the ability to diagnose patients with genetic diseases and discover new forms of ichthyosis not previously recognized. These new methods, including “whole exome sequencing”, allow researchers to detect alterations or mutations in the functional parts of all of the genes. A recent example of the power of these DNA sequencing methods is the identification of a new form of ichthyosis caused by mutations in the gene called ELOVL4 that codes for an enzyme with the same name.

Frontiers in Ichthyosis Research  -  2010
Meeting Report

Frontiers in Ichthyosis Research, an international meeting of investigators actively involved in research directly related to ichthyosis, was held in June 2010, immediately preceded FIRST's bi-ennial family conference.
 

 



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